Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘skin to skin contact’

Before I sign off for a few weeks for a Christmas break, I just wanted to share this fantastic story about skin to skin contact/kangaroo care that brought a tear to my eye. It’s the story of a Sydney couple whose twins were born prematurely, and they were told only one would survive. As the mother cuddled the newborn to her chest, something amazing began to happen…

Have a great Christmas and I’ll be back in the New Year.

Read Full Post »

Kangaroo care refers to early skin to skin contact between a mother and her newborn infant. It involves the newborn infant being placed straight onto the mother’s chest immediately after birth. The infant is covered with a blanket on top, but has bare skin to skin contact with mum for as long as the mother and infant are happy.

There seems to be a culture in our society of taking the baby away to be weighed and examined, cleaned up and wrapped before being given to the parents to hold. Obviously if there is any concern about the infant’s health, then they need to be given the appropriate treatment, but in healthy babies, there is now evidence of the positive benefits of early skin to skin contact.

The Cochrane Library publishes systematic reviews of existing studies on particualr topics. By collating all the data and assessing the methodological merit of the studies, they aim to provide evidence based papers. They have a review, last updated in 2007, on early skin to skin contact (Moore ER, Anderson GC, Bergman N. Early skin-to-skin contact for mothers and their healthy newborn infants. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2007, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD003519. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003519.pub2).

This review found statistically significant evidence that early skin to skin contact had positive effects on the success and duration of breastfeeding, and trends towards positive effects on maternal affection behaviour during feeding and attachment. The infants also cried less and one group (late preterm infants) showed more stable cardiorespiratory function.The authors  also commented that there were no negative associations found.

It is completely natural and instinctive for mothers and their young to be in close contact after birth, and it makes sense that this creates the optimal physiological state for the pair. I am not against hospital births at all; both my children have been born under obstetric care in modern hospitals and personally, I wouldn’t have had it any other way. However, within that medical system, there are ways to make sure that you and your infant start your relationship in the best way possible, and one way is to make sure you have early skin to skin contact.

 

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: