Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for January, 2011

In dealing with newborn infants, I have found the concept of the fourth trimester very helpful. This is a phrase that I associate with Dr Harvey Karp, who has previously commented on this blog. He talks about the need to create an atmosphere similar to that of the womb while the newborn adjusts to life in the outside world, and his suggestions include swaddling, settling the infant on their side, suckling, and white noise. This phase lasts for the first few months of the infant’s life.

I also like the ideas of Dr William Sears, who advocates for attachment parenting. I have previously discussed his book ‘Nighttime Parenting’ on this blog, and his suggestions include frequent breastfeeding and co-sleeping, both of which I have used (note: co-sleeping is not recommended by ‘Sids and Kids’ or the health department.)

From an evolutionary point of view, it makes perfect sense that a newborn baby wants to be held all the time. I have blogged before about mother-infant attachment, and this is linked to the belief that infants are hard wired for survival. Survival for a tiny baby means being close to their mother. Being alone in a quiet room would be frightening for an infant, as they have absolutely no means of surviving on their own – their only chance is to display attachment behaviour which allows them to be in close proximity to their mother. My number one piece of baby equipment, and the one I recommend to everyone I know, is a sling: these help infants to feel safe and secure, and also allows the parent’s hands to be free to get things done around the house.

There is a perception in our culture that things like feeding/rocking/cuddling babies to sleep, responding to every cry, holding them all the time, or co sleeping creates ‘bad habits’ or ‘spoils’ babies, which is ridiculous. They are not infants for very long and our job is to help them transition from being completely dependant to secure children and adults.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Kangaroo care refers to early skin to skin contact between a mother and her newborn infant. It involves the newborn infant being placed straight onto the mother’s chest immediately after birth. The infant is covered with a blanket on top, but has bare skin to skin contact with mum for as long as the mother and infant are happy.

There seems to be a culture in our society of taking the baby away to be weighed and examined, cleaned up and wrapped before being given to the parents to hold. Obviously if there is any concern about the infant’s health, then they need to be given the appropriate treatment, but in healthy babies, there is now evidence of the positive benefits of early skin to skin contact.

The Cochrane Library publishes systematic reviews of existing studies on particualr topics. By collating all the data and assessing the methodological merit of the studies, they aim to provide evidence based papers. They have a review, last updated in 2007, on early skin to skin contact (Moore ER, Anderson GC, Bergman N. Early skin-to-skin contact for mothers and their healthy newborn infants. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2007, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD003519. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003519.pub2).

This review found statistically significant evidence that early skin to skin contact had positive effects on the success and duration of breastfeeding, and trends towards positive effects on maternal affection behaviour during feeding and attachment. The infants also cried less and one group (late preterm infants) showed more stable cardiorespiratory function.The authors  also commented that there were no negative associations found.

It is completely natural and instinctive for mothers and their young to be in close contact after birth, and it makes sense that this creates the optimal physiological state for the pair. I am not against hospital births at all; both my children have been born under obstetric care in modern hospitals and personally, I wouldn’t have had it any other way. However, within that medical system, there are ways to make sure that you and your infant start your relationship in the best way possible, and one way is to make sure you have early skin to skin contact.

 

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: